Dog walkers and oyster dredgers..

Monday, 6th April 2015 (Day 1, week 14)

Aiming for 1000 miles in one year

Total so far: 276.2 miles (4.7 miles this week)


Hello!

Well – what a lovely day it is today.  We went for a walk around the Trelissick Estate taking in the Fal Estuary and Lamouth Creek along with about 3 million dog walkers!!

Fal Estuary
Fal Estuary

Enjoy reading…

Rickety


Trelissick Estate including Lamouth Creek and Round Quay (4.7 miles)

We were early setting off today but even so Trelissick is busy with dogs clamouring to shepherd their owners down over the hill to the river.  We wend our way between them, seemingly the only people without a canine companion, and turn left at the foot of the hill to follow the river inland.

The sun is warm already and we’re probably overdressed, unused to venturing out without walking boots and gaiters at the very least.  The woods are full of the last daffodils, reminding us that we saw the first daffodil of the year here, back in January.  Primroses too, line the wooded banks of the river.

We see a squirrel perched serenely in a tree, unconcerned about us, and watch blackbirds scuffling in the undergrowth.

A little way along the river, past the oyster beds, we see two sailing boats, their sails hoisted, drifting downriver.  There’s no wind, and their progress is slow, which suits us as they are a beautiful sight to see.

Falmouth working boats
Falmouth working boats
Falmouth Working Boat
Falmouth Working Boat

They are Falmouth Working Boats, used for oyster dredging since the 19th century. They are now thought to be the last fleet of fishing boats anywhere in the world which operate only under sail, as they are not allowed to dredge for oysters using power.  They’re also restricted as to when they are allowed to dredge, and most of the remaining working boats are now used for racing. A passing fellow with two very bouncy retrievers, stops to chat, telling us that they were once used to carry tin from local Round Quay over to Wales.

We carry on past the King Harry Ferry clanking its way backwards and forwards across the water and cross the road to climb uphill through the woods.  We’re now skirting Lamouth Creek, the tide is low and the water calm but there are still few birds about.  We see shelduck and some egrets but probably the sheer number of dogs has frightened anything else into hiding.

Egrets on the Fal Pen and Ink on Paper
Egrets on the Fal
Pen and Ink on Paper

Crossing the little wooden bridge we turn right and walk past the iron age fort, now subsumed by the woods and on towards Round Quay, said to have been built especially to welcome Queen Victoria and Prince Albert to Cornwall.  Unfortunately they didn’t show up!

After a brief wander here, we head back, turning right up the steep spiralling path and across the road to the fields of Trelissick, still full of daffodils. As we jostle our way through the dog walkers looking for a cup of tea, we bump into our friend, Mr O, and stop for a chat (don’t forget to click that ‘follow’ button, Mr O!!).

The Water Tower at Trelissick.  Built as a reservoir for the estate and now used as holiday lets by the National Trust
The Water Tower at Trelissick. Built as a reservoir for the estate and now used as holiday lets by the National Trust

Bird of the day:

Little Egret (Egretta garzetta – what a great Latin name!)

Little Egret
Little Egret

You can just see one in this picture!

It is a type of heron, but much smaller than the grey heron.  Feeds on its own but breeds in colonies (called heronries – remember?)

We also saw:

blackbirds, blue tits, shelduck, and in the cafe garden, chaffinch, where they loiter hoping for crumbs.


Flower of the day:

Green alkanet (Pentaglottis sempervirens)

Green alkanet
Green alkanet

Commonly found in woods and hedgerows in Devon and Cornwall, similar looking to borage, although this plant has no known culinary or medicinal use.  It was used by Egyptian women to make red dye (henna) for use on hair and nails.

We also saw:

primroses, daffodils and wild strawberry.

Wild strawberry
Wild strawberry

On Pilgrims Way-1

Associated artwork for Ricketyrambler by Mr RR:

http://www.andrewmajorart.co.uk

http://www.artistsandillustrators.co.uk/Andrew-Major

2 thoughts on “Dog walkers and oyster dredgers..

  1. MAJOR Laura April 6, 2015 / 5:02 pm

    Get a dog! A wire-haired lurcher. Woof woof!

    I have not followed you on Twitter yet as I am making another Twitter account for my non-work life and will follow you there xx

    Laura Major PhD Candidate, Social Anthropology University of Edinburgh

    http://bit.ly/ResearchProfile Twitter: @excogitating

    From: ricketyrambler <comment-reply@wordpress.com> Reply-To: ricketyrambler <comment+lj1s9rhzf9lj50hqm4xk6v@comment.wordpress.com> Date: Monday, 6 April 2015 17:41 To: Laura Major <l.major@ed.ac.uk> Subject: [New post] Dog walkers and oyster dredgers..

    ricketyrambler posted: “Monday, 6th April 2015 (Day 1, week 14) Aiming for 1000 miles in one year Total so far: 276.2 miles (4.7 miles this week) Hello! Well – what a lovely day it is today. We went for a walk around the Trelissick Estate taking in the Fal Estua”

    Like

  2. ricketyrambler April 6, 2015 / 9:09 pm

    I may have to! In case I get lost on Dartmoor…….maybe it ought to be a St Bernard!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s