Beachcombing in North Berwick

DSCN5591.JPG

Hello!

Thanks to everyone for letting me know you are still there and reading! It was lovely to hear from so many people.  So we’ll keep going for a while and see how the walking goes….

Tomorrow we’re away to Pitlochry for a couple of days, it sounds like we’re meeting up with Storm Helene so not sure how much walking there will be – but there will be some pretty pictures!  And last week we took a trip to Dryburgh Abbey – one of my favourite local places to go.  However I’m saving that blog for after next weekend when we’re hopefully going back to watch a stonemason at work – maybe he’ll let me have a go!

Anyway – yesterday we took a trip to North Berwick – about an hour away and my favourite beach to walk along.  It was very windy!! We managed a couple of miles each way and then forced ourselves to eat fish and chips before heading home with pockets full of shells and bits of pottery….


North Berwick east along the beach to Longskelly Point and back (4 miles)

Just before we reached North Berwick, as we drove past Tantallon Castle, we could look out to Bass Rock and see the thousands of birds – mostly gannets – swirling and diving all around it so we stopped for some pictures:

DSCN5588.JPG
Bass Rock – you have to look really closely but all those white dots around the rock are gannets – and the rock is covered in them – its where they live.

The tide was out so we managed to walk the whole way without having to resort to scrambling up and through the golf course.  I was impressed with how little plastic I saw on the beach, there was lots of wood – planks washed in from the sea which Mr RR coveted – and some large tree trunks, but mostly sand, shells and seaweed – just as it should be.

DSCN5592.JPG
North Berwick beach looking back towards Berwick Law
DSCN5638.JPG
I tried to identify some of these shells – but impossible without bringing some home and measuring them and peering at them in detail!  Maybe next time.
DSCN5632.JPG
Seaweed – another identification project for a rainy day!

Here’s a collection of stuff we brought home with us:

DSCN5672.JPG
Yes….a pair of spectacles! Mr RR is very pleased with them and says they are better than his own! (if they’re yours, just say and we’ll post them on!).

We didn’t bring this home with us – just thought it looked good:

DSCN5637

DSCN5618.JPG

There are a chain of islands in the Firth of Forth in addition to Bass Rock:

DSCN5595.JPG
Craigleith – meaning Rock of Leith, also home to bird colonies including about 28,000 pairs of puffins – but historically a rabbit breeding warren where the rabbits were bred for food.
DSCN5596.JPG
The Lamb – very small and apparently locally known now as Uri’s island as it was purchased by Uri Geller in 2009 for £30,000 because he believed Egyptian treasure was buried there.  He spent a day there but has never returned!
DSCN5597.JPG
Fidra – an RSPB Scotland Nature Reserve.  The lighthouse was built in 1885. The island is said to be the inspiration for Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island.

There were plenty of gulls of course:

DSCN5639.JPG

and gannets:

DSCN5603.JPG

also a redshank:

DSCN5601
The Macmillan Fieldguide to Bird Identification says this is ‘a rather dumpy, featureless wader’ – hmm…I think he’s quite lovely!

There was a crow sitting on a lichen covered rock very photogenically:

DSCN5626.JPG

and a pied wagtail who really didn’t want his picture taken!

DSCN5609.JPG

My feet had gone far enough by this time so we hobbled back into town stopping for a look over the harbour walls and to find out about the Lobster Hatchery – a project implemented to repopulate the Forth with a sustainable source of lobsters

DSCN5655.JPG

Then it was time for fish and chips!  See you next time.

 

 

DSCN5657.JPG

 

Budle Bay near Bamburgh, Northumberland

DSCN5573

Hello,

It was April 2017 when I last posted on here and as I’ve just had a reminder from wordpress that my annual subscription is due….I thought I’d see if anyone was still out there!

Lots of stuff going on in the last year, none of which I’m talking about here except to say that my ricketiness has extended to my feet – which is pretty poor news for a walker!  However, I have a lovely acupuncturist who is working hard to help me get better and today Mr RR and I did our first good walk for a long time.  It was going to be just 4 miles and ended up being nearly 7 (!) which is probably a bit more than I wanted to do….but we made it back (well I hobbled) to Bamburgh for tea and shortbread which is the important thing!

Anyway – let me know if you’re reading and I’ll see if I recover enough to try another ramble later this week.


Sunday, September 9th 2018

Bamburgh to Budle Bay circular (7 miles – which included some wandering about the beach)

IMG_0599

The Lindisfarne Nature Reserve in Budle Bay:

DSCN5574.JPG

Home to hundreds of birds but it was really difficult to take pictures because of the high winds and also my failure to charge my camera before we left home!

DSCN5577.JPG
Curlew
DSCN5586.JPG
Oyster Catcher

The kite surfers were worth seeing too:

DSCN5572.JPG

And across the bay – Holy Island.

DSCN5579.JPG
The tides were all wrong for us to visit Holy Island today.

See you again soon hopefully!

J x

Lilliesleaf and The Riddell Estate

12th April 2017

Mr RR and I had a lovely ramble around Lilliesleaf and The Riddell Estate last week along with Nancy and Chris.  It was a good day – it stayed dry and there was some blue in the sky, lambs in the fields and a coffee shop called the Jammy Coo at the end!  What more could you want?

DSCN4931.JPG
Okay – so the sky wasn’t blue at this point…but there are lambs!

We started in the lay-by opposite the church (a very important point according to Nancy and Chris!) in Lilliesleaf, a pretty village in between Melrose and Selkirk. Wikipedia tells us that the current population of Lilliesleaf is 301 – I’m not sure if it really is…..maybe someone’s had a baby since that was written! Continue reading

Abbotsford circular via Cauldshiels Loch

DSCN4915.JPG

A nearly 5 mile circular from Sir Walter Scotts House visiting Cauldshiels Loch on the way.  You can read about the walk which we’ve done before, here: Two Lochs and some views .  It was May last time we walked here and there were lots of wild flowers about.  It was too early for those this time, we saw some hawthorn just coming into flower and the wild garlic is budding up now but that was about it. Continue reading

Coldingham and St Abbs

DSCN4790.JPG
Coldingham Sands from the Coast Path

26th March 2017

Well, it’s been a while but yesterday we ventured out in the beautiful spring sunshine and did a 7 mile circular walk from Coldingham via St Abbs Head.  You can read more about walks we did in the area here: Coldingham Walk ; and more about St Abbs Head and Mire Loch here: St Abbs Head.

So today we did the whole circuit combining the Coldingham and St Abbs Head walks, in the glorious sunshine and accompanied most of the way by the incessant guttural cacophony from thousands and thousands of Guillemot which were perched precariously all along the rocky coast. Continue reading

January – Walk of the Month!

DSCN4611.JPG
Otter on the River Tweed!

29th January 2017

Hello

I’ve decided this one is ‘walk of the month’ for January.  We walked it yesterday, having been confined to the house by the truly miserable January weather for a few days.  We convinced ourselves that once we were out and about, all would be well – and it was.  The sun came out followed by all manner of birds and beasts!  I think there was more variety of wildlife on this walk than we’ve ever seen before in one walk!

Continue reading

Blackadder Water, Blackcastle Rings and the Mountain Sheep of Deil’s Neuk

DSCN4483.JPG
Blackadder Water

22nd January 2017

Here we are again!

A shortish riverside walk from Greenlaw through a beautiful glacial valley, a climb up to an iron age fort and a cup of tea at the Deil’s Neuk. There was mist and drizzle, sleet and snow.  We saw deer and dippers and lots and lots of sheep. Continue reading